In early October 2017, Siem Reap, Cambodia, was hit by a large monsoon and most of the town flooded. Soi Souen and Srey Kim Orn’s shelter was located on the edge of the Tonle Sap lake in Phnom Krom village. During this monsoon their shelter was washed away. This was devastating to the family. We aim to raise enough money to help to provide housing materials and help them build a ‘home’ not just a shelter. Helping one person may not change the world, but it could change the world for that one person. Even the smallest donation can make a big difference.

15

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$ 1319.8

donated of $ 1500.0 goal
87.98666666666666%

65 days

About this campaign

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Project overview 

  • Health, Hygiene and Education (HHE) are raising money to help a disadvantaged Cambodian family buy building materials to build a new ‘home’. 
  • Soi Souen and Srey Kim Orn’s shelter was located on the edge of the Tonle Sap lake in Phnom Krom village. Recently their shelter was washed away during a monsoon. 
  • Soi Souen and Srey Kim Orn work hard to provide for their 8 children and themselves, however due to life circumstances they have been unable to build a secure house for themselves and their family.
  • They have acquired land and have begun the process of building a new shelter but without our help this will only be an open shelter with a roof.
  • In discussion with the family it has been decided to build a tin roofed house. The house design will be modelled on other Cambodian tin houses and will take into consideration Cambodian climate.
  • The family will be involved in every aspect of the project. We will collaborate with the family to ensure we create a home that is best suited to them.

  • The family will assist in design and gain skill development through being involved in the actual construction.

  • As HHE's focus is to improve heath, hygiene and education, parents and older children will participate in a health and hygiene  program. Parent will also be asked to encourage children to stay in school and complete year 12. This is a minimum requirment we ask of the families we help. 

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More detailed information: 

In early October 2017, Siem Reap, Cambodia, was hit by a large monsoon and most of the town flooded. Soi Souen and Srey Kim Orn’s shelter was located on the edge of the Tonle Sap lake in Phnom Krom village. During this monsoon their shelter was washed away. This was devastating to the family.

 

Soi Souen and Srey Kim Orn work hard to provide for their 8 children and themselves, however due to life circumstances they have been unable to build a secure house for themselves. They have acquired land and have begun the process of building a new shelter but without our help this will only be an open shelter with a roof.

 

We aim to raise enough money to provide housing materials to help them build a ‘home’ not just a shelter.

 

“Helping one person may not change the world, but it could change the world for that one person”

 

Please help us to change the world for this family. Even the smallest donation can make a big difference.

 

A bit more information about the family:

Soi Souen is a fisherman. He and his sons spend each day on the lake working hard to earn money for their family. Srey Kim Orn stays at home to take care of their small children. They have 3 small children who are yet to go to school. They are 5, 3 and 1 years old. They also have a 7-year-old son who will begin school this month.

 

The two boys who help their father on the lake also attend school. In Cambodia school is attended either in the morning or the afternoon time, 6 days a week. The boys are aged 17 and 12.

 

Their eldest daughter (20) is already married and does not live at home. The second eldest daughter (18) currently lives with her uncle and is still studying. She would love to live at home with her mother, father and brothers and sisters. Which is an opportunity we can provide by helping this family build a secure ‘home’ big enough to accommodate all.

 

Why we need to help:

In recent years, Cambodia has moved closer to lower-middle-income status through resounding economic growth. This has been driven by solid performances in garment manufacture, tourism, paddy and milled rice, and construction. Between 2007 and 2012, the poverty rate (classified by those living on under $0.93 USD a day) fell from about 50% to below 20% of the country’s population.

 

Despite the economic growth, in 2017 more than 70% of Cambodians still live on less than $3 a day, which means that many of them remain vulnerable to falling back into poverty.

 

A house is not only a place to sleep:

Housing for people living in poverty is an unescapable problem that means more than just having a nice place to sleep. When people living in poverty, in some cases living on less than a dollar a day, to obtain a home, wonderful things happen and almost every facet of life changes!

 

  • Health improves because the family are now living in a house which provides a more hygienic envionment. 
  • Improved health for children also brings a sense of well-being for the parents.  As any parents know, when the child is well the parent is more at ease.
  • Having a place to reside often means having a place to generate an income.  A significant proportion of people living in poverty in the world generate income from their homes. 

As we can see, improved housing establishes a pattern of improvement from health to economics and education as well as community development. These improvements are important in that they can help break the cycle of poverty for many people.  However; there is one more additional aspect that can be identified with profound importance to the poor in the world who acquire a new secure home. Protection! This impact has benefits both physically and mentally. A simple home with a locking door provides degrees of protection that every human deserves.

 

Project proposal:

In discussion with the family it has been decided to build a tin house. The house design will be modelled on other Cambodian tin houses and will take into consideration Cambodian climate.

 

For your information: Why are people choosing to use tin in replacement of thatch in hot countries?
 

  • Increased "household income": Thatch roofs not only leak regularly, but can collapse several times a year. A tin roof, which lasts 10–15 years, approximately $100 per year that would have been spent on the labor and materials for re-thatching the roof.
  • Water reuse: we propose building metal roofing with a gutter, which allows them to collect rainwater during the rainy season. As rainwater is often cleaner than local water sources, this may reduce incidence of waterborne diseases like typhoid fever and cholera.
  • Fewer mosquitos (and mosquito borne diseases): Thatch roofs leak and collect moisture, which makes them a favorite hiding place for mosquitoes. In addition to the comfort of having fewer bugs in their homes, evidence suggests that people living under metal roofs may also experience lower rates of mosquito borne diseases.

How the family will be involved in the project:

We encourage the family to be involved in every aspect of the project. We aim to collaborate with the family to ensure we create a home that is best suited to them. This also provides the family with a sense of pride and accomplishment of building their own home. We foresee that the family will assist in design and skill development through being involved in the actual construction.

 

So that we can ensure that this project has a lasting effect and an overall improvement of health, hygiene and education we will be requesting that the parents commit to encouraging all children stay in school and finish year 12. Parents and older children will also participate in a health and hygiene program. 

 

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